Articles

Arches National Park Hikes

Discover and explore the best hiking trails in Arches. Arches National Park has hiking trails that are perfect for every age and skill level. Many of Arches easy trails lead to picturesque viewpoints that have graced the cover of many magazines.  Some of the longer moderate and difficult hikes offer adventure far from the road and the crowds of people. Many of these hikes lead to stunning arches and other geological features that few visitors ever see.  Remember to plan accordingly for your hike. In the summertime temperatures can soar above 95 degrees and most trails in Arches have little or no shade. Make sure to carry plenty of water and know your limitations.

More Trail Collections

Best Easy Hiking Trails in Arches

Discover these easy hikes in Arches National Park. These trails are great for all ages and feature incredible scenery of some of the park’s namesake features. For the best photography opportunities, hike to Delicate Arch, Skyline Arch, Balanced Rock,The Windows and Courthouse Towers in the late afternoon. Hit the trail in the early morning for the best photography of Double Arch.

0.1 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Delicate Arch Viewpoint is a short family friendly and ADA accessible hike to Utah’s iconic arch.

0.3 (miles)

 Easy;

Loop

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Balanced Rock is a very easy ADA accessible and family friendly hike to a picturesque rock formation in Arches National Park.

1 (miles)

 Easy;

Loop

~200 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

The Windows in Arches National Park is an easy family friendly hike that leads to three massive and beautiful arches.

0.5 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Double Arch Trail in Arches National Park is a great hike for small children and adults alike that leads to the base of a giant arch.

0.4 (miles)

 Very; Easy

Out & Back

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Sand Dune Arch Trail in Arches National Park is a very easy hike to a secluded and beautiful arch. This hike a great choice for families.

0.4 (miles)

 Very; Easy

Out & Back

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Skyline Arch Trail in Arches National Park is a very easy family friendly hike that features stunning scenery.

0.5 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Courthouse Wash Rock Art Panel is a perfect hike for small children in Arches National Park. The trail features amazing history, wildlife and tremendous scenery.

Best Moderate Hiking Trails in Arches

These moderate trails in Arches are perfect for hikers looking to get off the beaten the path. For the best pictures, hike to Landscape Arch after your morning coffee. Head down the trail to Park Avenue later in the afternoon.

2 (miles)

 Easy;

Loop

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Broken Arch Trail in Arches National Park is an easy family friendly hike that leads to stunning scenery.

1.6 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Landscape Arch Trail in Arches National Park is wonderful family friendly hike that leads to an amazing arch.

2 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~325 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Park Avenue in Arches National Park is a family friendly hike that offers up close views of towering sandstone spires.

Best Difficult Hiking Trails in Arches

Looking for adventure in Arches? Look no further. These trails are for hikers who want to escape the crowds and explore the lesser known areas that are only accessible by foot. Tower Arch, Fiery Furnace and Delicate Arch are best hiked in the afternoon if you crave awesome pictures. Double O Arch makes for a great early morning hike and the Devil’s Garden Trail is spectacular anytime of the day.

3.4 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~650 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Tower Arch Trail in Arches National Park near Moab is a short kid friendly hike that leads to an amazing arch.

7.2 (miles)

 Moderate;

Loop

~1200 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Devil’s Garden is a tough hike in Arches National Park that passes by 8 stunning arches. This hike kid friendly, but the entire length may be too much for young kids.

3 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~480 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Delicate Arch Trail leads the iconic symbol of Arches National Park and is great choice for families.Click for

4 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~700 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Double O Arch is a moderate hike in Arches National Park that leads to several stunning Arches. This trail is great for families who want to explore the park.

Up to you! (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

Options (Elev. Δ – ft)

Utah

Arches

Fiery Furnace in Arches National Park is a great hike for those that seek adventure, solitude and cross country travel.…

picture of one of the most popular trails in the USA

Appalachian Trail lightning strike survivor needs your help finding closure Archived Story

Feature

Author: Mike Smith
Date: 01.04.16


UPDATED: 7:45 1.4.2016 with additional and clarifying information.

On the afternoon of June 18, 2015 two sisters were backpacking together along the Appalachian Trail near Washington Monument State Park in rural Maryland when the weather began to take a turn for the worse. One hour later a single bolt of lighting would forever change their lives.

Sisters Mollyann Hart and Lauren Bognovitz had spent the weeks prior to June 18th getting ready for their first-ever backpacking trip together. Preparation was standard: knocking off day-hikes, testing out gear, learning their limits; and the pair could not have been more excited to hit the trail. Having grown up in Montgomery County, Maryland, the Maryland section of the Appalachian Trail seemed like a natural choice for their first serious trip, a 3-4 day backpacking adventure.

The two decided to tackle the section between Pen Mar, Pennsylvania and Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia. With their destination set and a thirst for adventure ready to be quenched, Mollyann and Lauren hit the trail.  A quick review of the weather conditions revealed a 30 percent chance of thunderstorms for the duration of the trip; equipped with rain gear and weather apps on their phones if Mother Nature decided to not play nice, the sisters determined the weather was not enough to deter.

Day One of the trip went about as well as could be hoped for as they took in the breathtaking scenery with each step of the white-blazed trail. “It was a blast… It was our first time on a multi-day trip. The first 4 hours were hard as heck, because we were practically rock-climbing. And being a first timer, I way overpacked. I probably had enough food to last a week and a half at least.”  Said Mollyann.  Overpacked perhaps but filled with exuberance, in one short day she’d come to appreciate the AT as more than just a 2,190 mile dirt path and instead as a community stretching from Georgia to Maine. “Meeting all these wonderful people who are so pure and are all fearlessly hiking their own hikes was so liberating and inspiring… I felt honored to finally experience it.”

At sunset they settled down, equal parts tired and exhilarated. After a quick dinner and a few bites of banana bread given to them by trail angels at the Cowall shelter, the two crawled into their tent and chatted about the amazing scenery and just how spectacular it was to be amongst nature. That evening the skies opened up and rhythmic rain hammered their tent walls throughout the night, however, by morning the sisters awoke to the pleasant tune of birds chirping. With the rain stopped, skies looking exactly the same as the previous day, and their attempt to check the weather apps foiled by lack of cell service, the pair pressed on.

The morning of Day Two continued much the same as the previous the day, with the duo traveling the well-beaten path through the beautiful mixed-hardwood forest, bursting with deer, squirrels, chipmunks and set to the tunes of songbirds. As the miles passed and with the sun rising high overhead, rain again started to fall.  It was not a downpour like the previous night, more “steady rain…a little bit more than a drizzle” and with no lightning or thunder in sight or sound they were not particularly worried, thinking it just a little rain. Having just sloshed through South Mountain and Greenbrier State Parks they decided to take a lunch break at the old Washington Monument to get out of the weather.

View from an overlook in South Mountain State Park the day of the accident.

Right when they got inside it started to pour again, so the pair decided to hole up for a bit and wait it out. The old Washington Monument is normally a popular spot for hikers to climb to the top and take in the view, but today it was a much-needed shelter from the elements (one other hiker would also take shelter inside the monument). The perceived safety of the 34-foot high monument was short-lived; the weather took a serious turn for the worse and just as they started to realize they were in a very bad situation a thunderous boom rattled the walls and shook the ground of the stone tower.  “I turned to my sister and said well! That was terrifying!” Mollyann recalls.  Then before she could utter another word… A flash and a ferocious bolt of lightning scored a direct hit on the tower.  The force of the violent blast threw them like ragdolls out of the doorway and onto the steps outside.  “I landed head-first on the stone steps.”  The next roughly half an hour was nothing short of complete chaos with Mollyann’s life hanging in the balance.

The blast, electrical shock and crushing blow to the head had left Mollyann unconscious.  Lauren, however, did not lose consciousness – instead finding herself in something of a daze. Upon gathering herself, she realized Mollyann had been badly hurt. The massive gash in Mollyann’s forehead was gushing blood like a fountain, and to her horror she was not breathing. “My sister had to give me CPR… I was blue,” recalled Mollyann succinctly. With Lauren at her sister’s now breathing but still unconscious side the shelter’s other hiker, who had not been badly injured, took off down the trail to get help. The second soon-to-be Good Samaritan had by now made his way up trail and upon seeing the terrified look on Lauren’s face dropped his pack and took off sprinting down the trail–all with no words exchanged.  It was around this time that Mollyann regained consciousness: “I don’t remember the accident, I remember waking up and having no idea where I was or who I was, my sister kept telling me that I had fell, but I didn’t understand…” All she knew was “everything hurt.”  

Lauren stayed by her sister’s side waiting for help to arrive.  The wet stone steps washed red with blood when rescuers arrived via four-wheeler to take her off the mountain and into a waiting ambulance. The entire time Lauren tried to keep her sister calm but the confused Mollyann had heard her “whisper to the [Rangers/paramedics] that [she had been] hit by lightning.” Mollyann remembers, “it was then that I started freaking out. I touched my head and I could feel bone, I was certain I was going to die…” As the rescuers loaded Mollyann onto the ATV to get her off the mountain, “I kept telling the woman paramedic that she needed to call ahead and get the CT scan ready, I couldn’t answer any questions about where I was but I was demanding a head-CT as if I had any clue what I was talking about.”  

An excerpt from the journal of a thru hiker who was passing through at the time provides more perspective on the severity of the storm:

“Thursday, June 18, I was in George Washington State Park in rural Maryland, when in the late afternoon a crazy thunder and lightning storm broke open in full fury. I had nowhere to run and hide. There was no time separation between the flashes and the bangs – if you know what I mean. And I was hiking in the water up past my ankles. All I could do was keep walking. Then I heard sirens, and they kept getting closer and closer. Finally the emergency vehicle speeds past me (I’m on the road/trail leading to the summit now). when I get to the top I found out that the lightning had struck the monument, blowing one 24 year old girl out of the structure (not hitting her directly) and down the front steps onto the stone front entry area. She was bleeding from a serious head injury” ~ ThruHiker Warren “Bull” Burbury’s Trail Journal

Mollyann in the hospital.

Mollyann was taken by ambulance to the Meritus Medical Center in Hagerstown. “The next couple days were rough and filled with lots of doctors, lots of tests.” Mollyann remembers.  She would learn that she was not directly struck by lightning but instead by a side flash strike. A side flash strike occurs when a lightning bolt strikes a taller object and portion of the current jumps from the taller object to the victim. The National Weather Service says “in essence, the person acts as a ‘short circuit’ for some of the energy in the lightning discharge.”  In this case the bolt struck the monument and Mollyann was the short circuit. The side flash strike left her with a laundry list of injuries: a traumatic concussion, a damaged optic nerve, intracranial hypertension, and permanently damaged vision. “Electricity definitely conducted in my head, because it burned a hole in my retina in my right eye – as a result I won’t be able to see much of anything out of it anymore… I can see fragments of the world but not all… I have no peripheral vision in that eye at all and am missing some of the peripheral vision in my left.”

Mollyann’s life was permanently changed by the accident. “The next couple of months were pretty tough, I stayed in bed and slept for about 3 months straight.” More than 6 months after the tragedy the effects are still being felt “obviously, I had a really bad concussion, which is still healing, but I’m able to participate in the real world now.” Surviving such an ordeal has left more than just physical scars on Mollyann, it’s left unpaid emotional debts. “There were a lot of people involved in saving my life… I want to thank them all… My sister obviously first and foremost, she breathed the life back into me when the lightning had knocked it out.” The hiker who was in shelter with them when the accident happened (and who ran for help) came and visited her in the hospital and they are now friends.  But one question mark remains for Mollyann…the mystery hiker who also ran for help.

“Knowing that some stranger literally dropped his pack to run down the mountain to find help without even missing a beat warms my heart… Because when my sister saw him, he gave her some hope to hold onto, knowing that someone was coming to help and that my survival wasn’t going to depend completely on her… I want to give him a big hug.”

Mollyann has been searching for the mystery Good Samaritan, but so far to no avail.  Please share this article in the hopes of tracking him down and giving Mollyann the chance to finally thank her trail angel.

For more articles and updates from TrailMob, be sure to sign up for our newsletter. …

hiking picture

Hikes in Lassen Volcanic National Park

Easy Hikes in Lassen Volcanic National Park

These easy hikes in Lassen Volcanic are perfect for visitors hiking with small kids or the elderly. All of these trails are less than 3 miles long and most are under two. But what they lack in length they make up for with incredible scenery.Ridge Lakes Trail

2 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~1050 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Ridge Lakes Trail is short but steep kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that offers hikers wonderful scenery.Click for trail detailsCold Boiling Lake Trail

1.4 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~40 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Cold Boiling Lake Trail is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that features great scenery and an interesting look at the wonders of Mother Nature. Click for trail details Kings Creek Falls

3 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~500 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Kings Creek Falls is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that leads to an incredibly scenic waterfall.Click for trail details Paradise Meadow Trail (LVNP)

2.8 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~700 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Paradise Meadow Trail is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that is a great choice for those enjoy hiking through an endless rainbow of wildflowers.Click for trail details Devastated Area Interpretive Trail

0.5 (miles)

 Very; Easy

Loop

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Devastated Area Interpretive Trail is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that is perfect for whole family to get out and stretch their legs. Click for trail details Lily Pond Nature Trail (LVNP)

0.75 (miles)

 Very; Easy

Loop

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Lily Pond Nature Trail is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that is perfect for the whole family.Click for trail details Manzanita Lake Trail

1.5 (miles)

 Easy;

Loop

Minimal (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Manzanita Lake Trail is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that is a great choice for the whole family to get out of the car and explore. Click for trail details Boiling Springs Lake Trail (LVNP)

1.8 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~300 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Boiling Springs Lake Trail is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that is perfect for hiker traveling with young children of the elderly. Click for trail details Crystal Lake Trail (LVNP)

0.8 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~380 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Crystal Lake Trail is an easy kid friendly lake hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that is a great choice of hikers traveling with young kids or the elderly.Click for trail details Inspiration Point Trail Lassen Volcanic N.P.

1.4 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~400 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Inspiration Point Trail is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that rewards hikers with breathtaking scenery in a short distance.Click for trail detailsHorseshoe Lake Trail (LVNP)

2.8 (miles)

 Easy;

Out & Back

~240 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Horseshoe Lake Trail is an easy kid friendly lake hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that is sure to please the whole family.Click for trail details

Moderate Hikes in Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic has a wide variety of hiking trails. The hikes listed below are ideal for hikers looking for a little bit of a longer hike. These trails are all about 3 to 5 miles long and feature wonderful scenery and wildlife viewing opportunities.Bumpass Hell Trail

3 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~300 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Bumpass Hell Trail is an easy kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that features an incredible display of thermal features.Click for trail details Mill Creek Falls Trail

4.6 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~310 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Mill Creek Falls Trail is a moderate kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that leads to the tallest waterfall in the park.Click for trail details Echo Lake Trail (LVNP)

4.4 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~415 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Echo Lake Trail is a moderate kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that features wonderful scenery.Click for trail details Terrace, Shadow and Cliffs Lake Trail

3.4 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~700 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Terrace, Shadow and Cliffs Lake Trail is a moderate kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that features wonderful mountainous lake scenery. Click for trail details Chaos Crags and Crags Lake Trail

4 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~850 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Chaos Crags and Crags Lake Trail is a moderate kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that offers wonderful scenery.Click for trail details Cinder Cone Trail (LVNP)

4 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~850 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Cinder Cone Trail is a moderate kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that rewards hikers with spectacular views.

5.8 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~610 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Terminal Geyser Trail is a moderate kid friendly hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that leads to some of the park’s spectacular thermal features.

4.2 (miles)

 Moderate;

Out & Back

~440 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Devil’s Kitchen Trail is a moderate hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that features tremendous thermal features.

3.8 (miles)

 Difficult;

Loop

~1250 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Mount Harkness Trail is a moderate kid friendly summit hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that rewards hikers with stunning views.

Difficult Hiking Trails in Lassen Volcanic National Park

Looking to get away from people and off the beaten path? These longer and more difficult hikes in Lassen Volcanic are for you. These trails are perfect for hikers looking for more of a challenge or to explore areas of the park far away roads. Brokeoff Mountain Trail

7.4 (miles)

 Difficult;

Out & Back

~2600 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Brokeoff Mountain Trail is a tough summit hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that features tremendous views of the park along the way.

4.8 (miles)

 Difficult;

Out & Back

~1950 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Lassen Peak Trail is a tough summit hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that rewards hikers with sweeping views of the park.

17.4 (miles)

 Strenuous;

Point to Point

Up and Down! (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Pacific Crest Trail Lassen Volcanic National Park section is a tough hike that explores all the park has to offer.

7 (miles)

 Difficult;

Out & Back

~1100 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Manzanita Creek Trail is a difficult hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park that is a great choice for hikers seeking a little solitude.

6.6 (miles)

 Difficult;

Out & Back

~2275 (+) (Elev. Δ – ft)

California

Lassen Volcanic

Prospect Creek Trail is a difficult hike in Lassen Volcanic National Park…

water source

Family of Now Infamous National Parks Tagger Speaks

Updated: 6/13/2016 9:30 PM MST
Casey Nocket has been sentenced for her vandalism spree. CLICK HERE for a full report. 

Updated: 10/30/2014  12:00 PM MST
Latest NPS Press Release: Identifies Nocket as suspect.

Updated:  10/27/2014  4:00 PM  MST
Latest article covering NPS response and investigation: “Wow!” – NPS Spokeswoman Remarks on National Park Service Vandalism Investigation. 

Updated:  10/25/2014  4:40 PM  MST
There is a rumor floating around that Casey Nocket has turned herself in.  That is false.  There is not a warrant for her arrest thus she does not have to turn herself in.  What she is doing is fully cooperating with investigators and showing remorse.  We spoke with a family member again this afternoon and have been told there is a meeting scheduled for Tuesday.  Until then, personal threats, vulgarities and posting of personal information should stop…  Posting her address or threatening bodily harm is not being a concerned citizen, it is not contributing to the debate, it is however, extremely dangerous.  We are a nation of laws, it is time to let the justice system do its work.

Original Article:  10/24/2014 10:00 PM MST
Over the last few days, social media has been abuzz over the graffiti antics of Creepytings, aka Casey Nocket.  Nocket branded some of our nation’s most sacred spots in the name of “art” and posted about it on social media.   Today, TrailMob.com spoke exclusively at length with a family member.

Casey Schreiner broke the story on his blog the modernhiker.com.  Since then, with the help of redditors and an outcry on other social media outlets, the story has been picked up by virtually every national media outlet.  While most of the larger media outlets have not directly named Nocket, social media certainly has not shown such restraint.  Search #CaseyNocket on twitter and you are greeted with hundreds if not thousands of tweets on the subject.  The phrase “Don’t be a #CaseyNocket” has become a battle cry for those upset with her actions.  And rightfully so, there is no doubt about it: the 21 year old Casey Nocket pulled a bone-headed stunt while out on an adventure that many can only dream of doing.  There is no way to play devil’s advocate on the subject, she is in the wrong.  Our national parks exist to “preserve and protect our nation’s natural, cultural and historic heritage for both current and future generations.” 

The story demonstrates the power social media has to mobilize thousands quickly.  That said, with power comes a responsibility for civility, and of the many different examples floating around the twittersphere, some are good, but some are in fact awful.  Right now there is a petition to the White House stating: “Please don’t allow her to receive a slap. Please pursue the most serious of charges for these offenses.”  Charges should and most certainly will be brought, but in accordance with the law and within the justice system:

36 CFR 2.31 – Trespassing, tampering and vandalism

(3) Vandalism. Destroying, injuring, defacing, or damaging property or real property

Federal crimes generally don’t come with slaps on the wrist.  According to the recent National Park Service Press Release, they are investigating “vandalism in at least 10 national parks in Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon, and Utah.”  It’s not clear if Nocket is responsible for all ten of these incidents, but she is most certainly responsible for many and thus should be punished accordingly. 

It’s the other side of this story that has caught our attention.  While activism is engrained in our society, when does it go too far?  Threats calling for physical violence are over the top and uncalled for.  She is in the wrong, but violence is most certainly not the answer.   We have all seen the horror stories on the news of what can happen if too much personal information is leaked online.  To be clear, this is not a defense of her actions, but a legitimate concern for a misguided youth’s safety.

Today we spoke with a relative of Nocket, who has requested that she not be named. It became clear at the beginning of the first conversation that this person was legitimately concerned for a family member’s safety.  While we were still introducing ourselves, that person’s voice made clear a distinct fear.   We spoke for awhile about Casey’s actions, here in plain language is what we found out: 

1)  She didn’t go into hiding or run, she contacted the Park Service investigators and is fully cooperating;

2)  She knows she did a horrible thing and is incredibly remorseful;

3)  She is aware of the seriousness of her crimes and is ready to face the music; and

4)  There are now people pretending to be her online, Tumblr in particular.  All of her social media accounts have been deleted.

Perhaps there is a silver lining to all of this, we can hope this will discourage copycats from pursuing such offenses, and perhaps highlight to the Federal government that the National Park Service’s 12 billion dollar backlog is ridiculous.  Think more rangers, more maintenance, more trail patrols.   Because while outcry for Nocket’s actions are fresh and loud right now, soon it will disappear just like her paintings on the rock, albeit with a little rubbing alcohol and a wash cloth.   It is our hope her actions can ultimately bring good and maybe a little more money to America’s Worst-Funded Best-Idea.  …

ghost

Ghost Story | The Legend of Spearfinger in the Smokies

The Great Smoky Mountains are no stranger to ghost stories. Over 200 cemeteries dot the park’s misty ridges and line hundreds of miles of its trails. While cemeteries are creepy in their own right, nothing is more frightening than the Cherokee legend of Spearfinger.

According to Cherokee lore, Spearfinger is an old witch that roams the rocky ridgelines of the smokies, most of all she is said to wander the north shore of Lake Fontana on the Norton Creek Trail.

Each autumn, as a chill takes to the air and the leaves begin to change, an unquenchable thirst is said to begin to boil deep within her. She uses supernatural powers to shift into the the image of an elderly grandmother; the sweet image coupled with the pleasantry of a song are used to lure unsuspecting children away from their parents. Begging children to help an old lady find her way back home or to sit on granny’s lap while she sings a song, the innocent children seeing their own grandmother in her image soon fall victim.

However, her sweet melody soon changes into vicious bloodthirsty tune once she has her prey in her grasp…

Uwe la na tsiku. Su sa sai

Liver, I eat it.  Su sa sai

Uwe la na tsiku. Su sa sai

With the swiftness of a cottontail and the accuracy of pouncing mountain lion, Spearfinger uses her dagger-like and razor-sharp index finger to cut the liver out of young children, devouring them with the greatest of pleasure, licking clean her slender finger.

As the night falls, the moon rises and thick fog descends on the mountain slopes, Spearfinger returns to the ridges and sits with her lone raven friend and sings her tune with giddy excitement, pondering who will fall her next victim…

Uwe la na tsiku. Su sa sai

Liver, I eat it.  Su sa sai

Uwe la na tsiku. Su sa sai

water source

Shades of Death Trail

The Shades of Death Trail is a renowned hiking trail located in Warren County, New Jersey. Stretching over seven miles, this trail offers a unique and thrilling experience for outdoor enthusiasts. With its intriguing name and breathtaking scenery, it has become a popular destination for hikers from near and far.

The trail gets its name from the dark and mysterious history surrounding it. Legend has it that in the 19th century, this area was plagued by a series of unexplained deaths, giving rise to its ominous name. While the exact origins of these stories remain unclear, they have only added to the allure of the trail, attracting thrill-seekers and history buffs alike.

Despite its eerie reputation, the Shades of Death Trail is a beautiful and peaceful place to explore. Surrounded by dense forests, tranquil lakes, and picturesque landscapes, it offers a unique escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Whether you’re an experienced hiker or a beginner looking for an adventure, this trail has something to offer for everyone.

the Shades of Death Trail is a captivating hiking destination that combines natural beauty with a touch of mystery. Its rich history and stunning scenery make it a must-visit location for outdoor enthusiasts. So, grab your hiking boots and embark on a journey along this intriguing trail to experience the shades of death for yourself.

5 Reasons you should visit the Shades of death trail

Firstly, the trail offers a captivating blend of natural beauty and eerie history. As you venture through the dense forest, you’ll be surrounded by towering trees, babbling brooks, and picturesque landscapes. However, what sets this trail apart is its haunting past. Legends and stories of mysterious disappearances and supernatural occurrences have shrouded the trail in an air of intrigue, making it an unforgettable experience for those seeking a thrill.

Secondly, the Shades of Death Trail provides a challenging and exhilarating hiking experience. With its rugged terrain and steep inclines, this trail is not for the faint of heart. As you navigate through the winding paths and rocky outcrops, you’ll be rewarded with breathtaking views and a sense of accomplishment. Whether you’re an experienced hiker or a novice looking for an adventure, this trail will test your limits and leave you with lasting memories.

Thirdly, the trail is a haven for wildlife enthusiasts. The diverse ecosystem along the trail is home to a wide array of flora and fauna. From vibrant wildflowers to elusive woodland creatures, you’ll have the opportunity to observe and appreciate nature in its purest form. Birdwatchers will be delighted by the variety of avian species that call this trail home, while animal lovers may spot deer, foxes, and even the occasional black bear.

In addition, the Shades of Death Trail offers a unique opportunity for history buffs to delve into the past. The trail takes its name from the legends and tales that have been passed down through generations. Exploring the trail allows you to immerse yourself in the rich history of the area and discover the stories behind its intriguing name. From Native American folklore to tales of early settlers, this trail is a treasure trove of historical significance.

Lastly, the trail provides a peaceful and rejuvenating escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. With its serene surroundings and tranquil atmosphere, the Shades of Death Trail offers a chance to reconnect with nature and find solace in its beauty. Whether you’re seeking solitude or a place to unwind with loved ones, this trail offers a much-needed respite from the chaos of modern living.

the Shades of Death Trail offers a unique and captivating experience for nature lovers, history enthusiasts, and adventure seekers alike. With its blend of natural beauty, thrilling hiking opportunities, diverse wildlife, rich history, and peaceful ambiance, this trail is a must-visit destination. Embark on this journey and discover the allure of the Shades of Death Trail for yourself.…

Instagram
Scroll to Top