Sagebrush

Artemisia arbuscula

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  • Sagebrush | Sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula) Photo: Matt Lavin
  • Sagebrush | Sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula) Photo: Matt Lavin
  • Sagebrush | Sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula) Photo: Matt Lavin
  • Sagebrush | Sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula) Photo: Matt Lavin
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Basic Information

Order

Asterales

Family

Asteraceae

Size

up to 9 ft

Leaf Color

Blue-Gray

Leaf Complexity

Simple

Blooming Season

Summer

Bloom Color

Yellow

Attracts

Wildlife

Can I eat Sagebrush?

Sagebrush leaves can be boiled into a fragrant tea.

Medicinal uses for Sagebrush

Native American Tribes used Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) for a wide array ailment. The Navajo breathed in Sagebrush vapors to relieve headaches. The Zuni believed boiling the plant helps with colds. Many Tribes drank Sagebrush tea to relieve nasal congestion.

Sagebrush Habitat

Sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula) is native to the open dry plains and foothills of the western United States. It requires a medium amount of water and full sun with well-drained, dry rocky soil.

Sagebrush Facts

Sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula) is the state flower of Nevada. Big Sagebrush or Great Basin Sagebrush is an evergreen shrub that can grow up to 9 ft. tall. Its gnarled spread is most often slightly less than its height. Sagebrush has a short grizzled trunk that may be branched at the base. Its blue-gray leaves have a distinctive aroma. Sagebrush is the dominant shrub throughout the Great Basin region and has seveal subspecies. It is an important food source for big game, especially in winter. Native American tribes used the fragrant leaves to kill odor in mocassins and as a disinfectant for cleaning. Burning the wood keeps pesky insects away.

Sagebrush Distribution



See also