Syringa

Philadelphus lewisii

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  • Syringa | Syringa (Philadelphus lewisii) Photo: Peter Stevens
  • Syringa | Syringa (Philadelphus lewisii) Photo: Peter Stevens
  • Syringa | Syringa (Philadelphus lewisii) Photo: Peter Stevens
  • Syringa | Syringa (Philadelphus lewisii) Photo: Peter Stevens
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Syringa Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Other names

Wild Mock Orange, Lewis' Mock Orange

Order

Cornales

Family

Hydrangeaceae

Size

up to 9 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Blooming Season

Spring - Mid Summer

Bloom Color

White

Attracts

Bees

Danger

Syringa (Philadelphus lewisii) can cause a skin irritation on certain sensitive people that is similar to that of poison oak or poison ivy.

Medicinal uses for Syringa

Some Native American Tribes uses a poultice of powered leaves or wood to treat sores or swollen joints.

Syringa Habitat

Syringa (Philadelphus lewisii) is native from British Columbia south to Central California and west to Montana. Syringa requires rocky slopes in onifer and mixed woodland forests. It requires a fair amount of sunshine.

Syringa Facts

Syringa (Philadelphus lewisii) is the state flower of Idaho. A loosely branched shrub gets covered in fragrant orange blossom scented white flowers in the spring. Its genus name is for the Egyptian King Ptolemy Philadelphus, while it's species honors Merewether Lewis. Native Americans used Syringa branches to make arrows and other tools. It's leaves and bark was used to make a mild soap.

Syringa Distribution



See also