Mountain Laurel

Kalmia latifolia

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  • Mountain Laurel | Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia) in Shenandoah National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Mountain Laurel | Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia) in Shenandoah National Park. Photo: NPS
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Mountain Laurel Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Other names

Ivybush, Spoonwood

Order

Ericales

Family

Ericaceae

Size

8 - 20 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Leaf Complexity

Simple

Leaf Shape

Oval

Blooming Season

Summer

Bloom Color

White, Pink

Attracts

Birds, Butterflies

Danger

All parts are poisonous! Mountain Laurel may be fatal is ingested. Symptoms of Mountain Laurel poisoning include but are not limited too excessive salivation, watery eyes and nose, slow pulse, nausea, vomiting, sweating, abdominal pain, headache, tingling of skin, lack of coordination, convulsions, paralysis.

Mountain Laurel Habitat

Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia) is common along trails in the eastern U.S. where it has access to shade and cool moist soil.

Mountain Laurel Facts

Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia) is an extremely toxic plant to humans, deer and most livestock. If accidentally ingested seek medical attention immediately. While toxic, it is also a highly showy broadleaf evergreen shrub native to the eastern U.S. When it blooms in the summer it is a favorite of birds and photographers alike! Its stunning white or pink flowers grace many trails in the Appalachians. Its wood is strong, but brittle. It was often used by Native Americans to make tools such as spoons, hence why it is also known as spoonwood.

Mountain Laurel Distribution



See also