Cow Parsnip

Heracleum maximum

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  • Cow Parsnip | Cow Parsnip (Heracleum maximum) in Great Basin National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Cow Parsnip | Cow Parsnip (Heracleum maximum) in Great Basin National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Cow Parsnip | Cow Parsnip (Heracleum maximum) in Great Basin National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Cow Parsnip | Cow Parsnip (Heracleum maximum) in Great Basin National Park. Photo: NPS
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Cow Parsnip Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Order

Apiales

Family

Apiaceae

Size

up to 7 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Blooming Season

Late Winter - Fall

Bloom Color

White

Attracts

Birds, Butterflies

Danger

Cow Parsnip can cause rashes on people with sensative skin.

Can I eat Cow Parsnip?

Cow Parsnip was an important food source to Native American Tribes who ate leaves and tender stalks.

Cow Parsnip Habitat

Cow Parsnip (Heracleum maximum) is a widespread wildflower that thrives in moist, partially shaded areas nationwide. It requires plenty of water and shade as well as moist clay or sandy soil.

Cow Parsnip Facts

Cow Parsnip (Heracleum maximum) is a tall wildflower with large leaves and flush umbels of tiny white blooms. Its stem is tough, woolly and hollow. Cow Parsnip is the largest member of the carrot family in North America and was in important food source to Native Americans. It is also a larval host to the Anise Swallowtail Butterfly (Papilio zelicaon)

Cow Parsnip Distribution



See also