Aspen

Populus tremuloides

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  • Aspen | Aspen (Populus tremuloides) fall foliage in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Aspen | Aspen (Populus tremuloides) fall foliage in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Aspen | Aspen (Populus tremuloides) fall foliage in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Aspen | Aspen (Populus tremuloides) fall foliage in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Aspen | Aspen (Populus tremuloides) fall foliage in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
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Aspen Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Other names

Quaking Aspen

Order

Malpighiales

Family

Salicaceae

Size

35-75 ft

Leaf Color

Green, Fall Foliage: Yellow, Orange

Blooming Season

Spring

Bloom Color

Yellow, Green, Brown

Attracts

Birds, Wildlife, Butterflies

Aspen Habitat

Aspen or Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) are common throughout the northern half of the United States through Alaska. They thrive where they can get plenty of water and sunshine.

Aspen Facts

Aspen or Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides) are a quick growing poplar with stunning bright yellow fall foliage. They grow quickly and have a short life span. The name Quacking Aspen refers to their flat leaves shimmering with even the slightest breeze. Its bark is smooth and in certain areas often marred by bear claws. Aspen is pioneer tree that often sprouts quickly after a fire or logging. It is also very important to wildlife. Big game enjoys its foliage and beavers and rabbits are often spotted snacking on its bark. Like all poplars, Aspens are a poor fire wood because it dries slowly and rots quickly not to mention it simply does not give off much heat. It is a larval host to the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly (Papilio glaucus) and Viceroy Butterfly (Limenitis archippus).

Aspen Distribution



See also