Western White Pine

Pinus monticola

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  • Western White Pine | Western White Pine (Pinus monticola) Photo: Jami Dwyer
  • Western White Pine | Western White Pine (Pinus monticola) Photo: Jami Dwyer
  • Western White Pine | Western White Pine (Pinus monticola) Photo: Jami Dwyer
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Western White Pine Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Other names

Mountain White Pine, Silver Pine

Order

Pinales

Family

Pinaceae

Size

70-190 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Leaf Complexity

Simple

Leaf Shape

Linear

Blooming Season

Spring

Bloom Color

Yellow

Attracts

Birds, Rodents

Can I eat Western White Pine?

Native American tribes used the Western White Pine for a variety of food sources. Its seeds are edible. The inner bark can be dried and ground into a powder or roasted. Young cones can be roasted and consumed as well.

Medicinal uses for Western White Pine

The turpentine obtained from the resin of all pine trees is immensely valuable antiseptic and diuretic.

Western White Pine Habitat

Western White Pine (Pinus monticola) is native to variety of mountain areas in the western North America. It thrives in well-drained soils between 2,000-9,000 ft. It requires a fair amount of water and plenty of sunshine.

Western White Pine Facts

Western White Pine (Pinus monticola) is the State Tree of Idaho. This striking evergreen with green needles in groups of five generally grows up to 150 ft. Western White Pine is an extremely important timber tree because it generally lacks large knots. It is very susceptible to White Pine Blister Rust (Cronartium ribicola), which was accidentally introduced from Europe in the early 20th century.

Western White Pine Distribution



See also