Western Hemlock

Tsuga heterophylla

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  • Western Hemlock | Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) Photo: Brewbooks
  • Western Hemlock | Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) Photo: Brewbooks
  • Western Hemlock | Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) Photo: Brewbooks
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Western Hemlock Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Other names

Pacific Hemlock, West Coast Hemlock

Order

Pinales

Family

Pinaceae

Size

150-230 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Leaf Complexity

Simple

Blooming Season

Spring

Bloom Color

Purple

Attracts

Birds, Rodents

Can I eat Western Hemlock?

The inner bark was used by a variety of coastal tribes as a food source. The young tips of branches were also chewed on to stave off hunger for certain tribes.

Medicinal uses for Western Hemlock

Most Coastal Tribes used Western Hemlock for a variety of medically purposes. Including, a poultices for covering wounds, a salve to prevent sunburn and many others uses.

Western Hemlock Habitat

Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) is native to western North America. It requires moist soil and wooded slopes below approximately 2000 ft. It grows best in areas with high humidity and lower summer temperatures.

Western Hemlock Facts

Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) is the State Tree of Washington and one of the most common trees in the Pacific Northwest. It has scaly bark, dark green needles and may reach heights of over 200 ft. Today the tree is an important timber source, but historically it served many uses for Native Americans. Including, a food and tool source as well as an easy way to make dyes. Some coastal Squalish tribes used Western Hemlock bark to make a brilliant red dye.

Western Hemlock Distribution



See also