Lodgepole Pine

Pinus contorta

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  • Lodgepole Pine | Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) in Yellowstone National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Lodgepole Pine | Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) in Yellowstone National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Lodgepole Pine | Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) in Yellowstone National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Lodgepole Pine | Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) in Yellowstone National Park. Photo: NPS
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Lodgepole Pine Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Order

Pinales

Family

Pinaceae

Size

up to 160 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Leaf Arrangement

Green

Leaf Complexity

Simple

Leaf Shape

Linear

Blooming Season

Spring

Bloom Color

Brown Cones

Attracts

Mountain Pine Beetles, Houses Birds

Can I eat Lodgepole Pine?

Lodgepole Pine tea is a great source of vitamin C. Pine nuts are edible and tasty. Inner bark is edible, can be boiled, fried or dried.

Medicinal uses for Lodgepole Pine

Native Americans boiled the inner bark and used it as a dressing for burns and infections. Moistened powder pine needsle can be used to sooth frostbie.

Lodgepole Pine Habitat

Lodgepole Pines (Pinus contorta) are a very adaptable conifer. They are common throughout the western United States from bogs to subalpine mountain slopes.

Lodgepole Pine Facts

Native Americans used Lodgepole Pines, as the name suggests, to erect teepees. Moreover, lodgepole resin was used to waterproof various objects, including canoes and moccasins. Today lodgepoles are an important in the timber industry. Mountain Pine Beetles and climate change are hurting Lodgepole Pine numbers.

Lodgepole Pine Distribution



See also