Douglas Fir

Pseudotsuga menziesii

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  • Douglas Fir | Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Douglas Fir | Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Douglas Fir | Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Douglas Fir | Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in Grand Teton National Park. Photo: NPS
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Douglas Fir Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Order

Pinales

Family

Pinaceae

Size

up to 150 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Leaf Complexity

Simple

Blooming Season

Spring

Bloom Color

Brown Cones

Attracts

Game Birds, Deer, Small Birds

Can I eat Douglas Fir?

Tea from the needles.

Medicinal uses for Douglas Fir

Native Americans used the resin to treat coughs and sour throats.

Douglas Fir Habitat

Douglas Firs (Pseudotsuga menziesii) thrive in moist soil with good drainage from lowlands to steep mountain slopes.

Douglas Fir Facts

Douglas Fir seeds are a very important food source for small game and birds, particular chipmunks, sparrows and finches. The tree is also an important source of lumber. The wood is used for a varity of products including household items, plywood and railroad ties. Douglas Fir grow quickly, thus a popular choice for Christmas trees as well. Native Hawaiians used Douglas Fir logs to build waŹ» kaulua, which are a type of canoe. It's also the official state tree of Oregon.

Douglas Fir Distribution



See also