Joshua Tree

Yucca brevifolia

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  • Joshua Tree | Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) Photo: Ken Lund
  • Joshua Tree | Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) Photo: Ken Lund
  • Joshua Tree | Joshua Tree (Yucca brevifolia) Photo: Ken Lund
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Joshua Tree Photo Gallery

Basic Information

Order

Asparagales

Family

Asparagaceae

Size

5-40 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Leaf Complexity

Simple

Blooming Season

Spring

Bloom Color

White

Attracts

Birds, Rodents

Can I eat Joshua Tree?

Native American Tribes of the southwest ate Joshua Tree flower buds in a variety of ways. Before opening they were boiled and eaten. Once opened they were roasted and enjoyed like a candy because of their high sugar content. The seeds and fruit were roasted an enjoyed as well.

Joshua Tree Habitat

Joshua Trees (Yucca brevifolia) are native to the arid mesas, mountain slopes and deserts of the American southwest. It is easiest observed in its namesake National Park above 3,500 ft. Joshua Trees required plenty of sun and sandy rocky soil.

Joshua Tree Facts

Joshua Trees (Yucca brevifolia) may resemble a tree, but are actually the largest of the yuccas. An icon of the Mojave Desert, they can grow up to 40 ft. tall. Its trunk shoots up to picturesque stiff branches bursting with blue-green dagger-like leaves. Mormon settlers named the species Joshua because they thought its weird branch shapes resemble the Biblical leader pointing towards the Promised Land. Native Americans used Joshua Trees as food source and to make dyes for decorations.

Joshua Tree Distribution



See also