Thimbleberry

Rubus parviflorus

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  • Thimbleberry | Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) in North Cascades National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Thimbleberry | Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) in North Cascades National Park. Photo: NPS
  • Thimbleberry | Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) in North Cascades National Park. Photo: NPS
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Basic Information

Other names

Western Thimble-Berry

Order

Rosales

Family

Rosaceae

Size

1.5-5 ft

Leaf Color

Green

Blooming Season

Spring - Late Summer

Bloom Color

White

Attracts

Bees, Songbirds, Wildlife

Danger

Warning! What out for thorns.

Can I eat Thimbleberry?

Thimbleberry fruit is larger, flatter and softer than its cousin the raspberry. While commercial cultivation is difficult, wild Thimbleberry Jam is common at local shops throughout its range. The fruit can be enjoyed raw, cooked or dried.

Medicinal uses for Thimbleberry

Rubus parviflorus was used by Native Americans for a wide array of medicinal purposes.

Thimbleberry Habitat

Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) is native from the Great Lakes to western North America. It thrives in a variety of areas, from meadows, wooded foothills, stream banks to canyons, so long as conditions are correct. It needs a lot of water and rocky soil to grow best.

Thimbleberry Facts

Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus) is an abundant wild berry throughout the northwest. It can grow up to about 5 ft. tall and is an important food source for a wide array of wildlife. It gets its common name; "Thimbleberry" from the thimble shape of its fruit. Its fruit is reminiscent of a raspberry but slightly softer, making commercial growth difficult. In fall this deciduous shrub loses its foliage. Its genus "Rubus" is Latin for "bramble" and includes other berries such as raspberries and blackberries.

Thimbleberry Distribution



See also